BREXIT | THERESA MAY MUST BE REMOVED FROM OFFICE


Olly Robbins

The bloke in the picture above is a nonentity. He’s an unelected British state bureaucrat who is paid more than the Prime Minister. His nickname is ‘Olly’ and his role is to negotiate with his fellow bureaucrats in the European Union ostensibly to extricate the UK from the EU. In fact, Olly’s heart is in keeping the UK in the European Union. Olly represents the total failure of democracy in the United Kingdom. Olly was appointed to his role – which is primarily to shape the future of our nation for generations to come – by the British Prime Minister, Theresa May. Theresa May is an utter disgrace of a politician and an affront to the office of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Consequently, I wrote the following letter to the Moray Conservative & Unionist Association, of which I’m a reluctant member, expressing why I think that my Member of Parliament should support the removal from office of Theresa May.


In June 2016, I voted for the UK to leave the European Union. Prior to the EU Referendum I had argued forcefully the case for the UK to recover its sovereignty. I did this informally in conversation, in letters to newspapers and through my website, Moraymint Chatter [1].

Cutting to the chase, I’m appalled at the Conservative government’s response to, and handling of the people’s decision to have the UK leave the EU.

The most recent YouGov poll shows that just 16% of voters feel that Mrs May is leading the handling of the Brexit negotiations well. Notwithstanding, on 24 July the Prime Minister announced that she would be taking control personally of the UK’s negotiations with the EU. This bodes well neither for the country, nor for the Conservative Party.

Furthermore, Mrs May has made it clear how the Brexit negotiations will be managed in practice. The Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, Dominic Raab, will be subordinate to a civil servant, Mr Oliver ‘Olly’ Robbins. Mr Robbins will handle the Brexit negotiations on a day-to-day basis and keep the Prime Minister informed of his decisions and progress as he sees fit. Mr Raab will deputise for Mrs May. The Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union is, therefore, nothing of the sort. On this basis alone, Mr Raab should resign forthwith. I would.

The democratic decision of the British electorate to end rule by unelected bureaucrats in Brussels is to be shaped by unelected bureaucrats in Whitehall whose sympathies lie squarely with the European Union. Mrs May is demonstrating a bizarre understanding of how a democracy should function. However, I’m not surprised at this since Mrs May herself voted for the UK to remain governed by the European Commission. Indeed, on being appointed Prime Minister, Mrs May then assembled a Cabinet the majority of whom would also prefer that the UK remained governed by the European Commission.

Is it any wonder, therefore, that the British government’s handling of the Brexit negotiations can best be described as a fiasco, and that over 80% of the country thinks along the same lines?

Mrs May is a disastrous Prime Minister. She is a liability both to our country and to the Conservative Party. However, perhaps what surprises and angers me more than Mrs May’s and the government’s incompetence is the willingness of Conservative MPs to shore up a bungling Prime Minister and Executive. This is not how our democracy is supposed to work.

On a parliamentary constituency basis, the country voted by 421 to 229 seats to leave the European Union; the actual Referendum result was skewed heavily by a relatively small number of Remain-voting constituencies in London and Scotland. On a regional basis [2], again the decision in favour of leaving the UK was 9 regions to 3, with London, Northern Ireland and Scotland skewing the overall Remain vote.

As an aside, quite why the Scottish National Party, whose raison d’etre is an independent Scotland, should want to see Scotland governed by Europe’s very own King George II, Jean-Claude Juncker, I’ve no idea. Indeed, I was surprised and disappointed that so many Conservative politicians expressed a preference in the EU Referendum for governance of the UK by a foreign oligarchy, but that’s so much water under the bridge. The EU Referendum vote was not about economics, it was about sovereignty, freedom and democracy. Thankfully the majority of British people understood this, even if many Conservative politicians didn’t.

The point is that there is an enormous grass-roots desire to have Parliament grip our shambolic Executive. However, this pressure, this desire for the balance of power to rest with the people (where it should rest, of course) seems to be going quite unnoticed by too many Conservative Members of Parliament. I wouldn’t expect socialists or liberals to comprehend this current failing of our democracy, but I really do expect the Conservative Party to get it.

So what? Well, the Parliamentary Conservative Party must remove Mrs May from her role as Prime Minister as a matter of urgency. Conservative MPs must write to the Chairman of the 1922 Committee, Sir Graham Brady, in strength and trigger a change of Prime Minister. The new Prime Minister must be a Leave-voting politician. That new Prime Minister must then assemble a Cabinet the majority of whom voted Leave in the EU Referendum. The new government must then extricate the UK from the EU, lock, stock and barrel. Its focus must be not on being seduced by the arguments and nonsense of ‘Project Fear’, but on the positive vision of the UK’s future expressed so ably by Boris Johnson in his resignation speech to the House recently.

My fellow Association members, despite what you read in the increasingly hysterical, pro-EU mainstream media (ably led by the BBC, of course) and the organisations that feed it – ‘big business’, the UK’s fanatically Europhile Establishment (Olly Robbins comes to mind) and, regrettably, the majority of the political class – leaving the European Union absolutely is not life-threatening.

On the contrary, aside from the defeatist attitude of the majority of the British political class, the UK is in fact a self-confident, outward-looking and highly capable nation state with a thousand-year history of economic, political and social progress which can and will thrive in a post-EU world. The European Union itself is doomed on the back of the Euro currency, open borders and uncontrolled migration, and Brussels-centred, undemocratic authoritarianism. It is a matter of time before the EU implodes and the sooner the UK is out of it, the better.

In conclusion, my request is that my Member of Parliament, Mr Douglas Ross, writes to Sir Graham Brady, Chairman of the 1922 Committee, expressing his lack of confidence in Mrs May as Prime Minister. However, if Mr Ross feels obliged to support Mrs May and the Executive then I shall not vote Conservative at the next General Election. Indeed, I shall argue and fight tooth-and-nail for any political party other than the Conservative Party which will, on the matter of the UK leaving the European Union, have betrayed both conservatism and the good people of our United Kingdom.

 

[1].  If one types ‘Moraymint Chatter’ into Google, the website is the top-ranked item.

[2].  West Midlands (L), East Midlands (L), North East (L), Yorkshire and Humber (L), East (L), North West (L), South West (L), Wales (L), South East (L), Northern Ireland (R), London (R) and Scotland (R).

————————————

Thank you for reading this post. Please click on any one or more of the social media buttons below to share the post if you agree with my sentiments. If you don’t agree with my sentiments, please comment and say so. If you agree with the thrust of this post, why not share it with your own Member of Parliament? If you’d like to follow me, please enter your details in the column on the right. Have a great weekend!

31 comments

  1. Robert E Lee · · Reply

    Excellent post as usual MM.
    I’d wager you never thought your Staff College writing skills would be so worthily employed, or so necessary in civvy street?
    I’ve taken the opportunity to post your last missive on my F/B timeline and given the required link to Moraymint Chatter.
    Keep banging the drum. Someone in power may just hear you.
    On a lighter note, given the major topic under discussion, whenever I Magna Carta invoked, I’m minded of the Tony Hancock quote, which always brings a wry smile to my face, “Does Magna Carta mean nothing to you? Did she die in vain? Brave Hungarian peasant girl who forced King John to sign the pledge at Runnymede and close the boozers at half past ten. Is all this to be forgotten?”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      Love it! A troubled man (Hancock that is, although John was very strange – and weak – too), but I always loved his humour. Showing my age now. Incidentally my MP, Douglas Ross, has responded to this and my previous billet-doux – in essence accepting my points of view, albeit guardedly of course …

      Like

      1. Robert E Lee · · Reply

        Douglas Ross’s reaction is typical of the wishy-washy, hand wringing, water-treading attitude we’ve become accustomed to from politicians of all stripes, notably, the putative ‘Conservative party’.
        There’ll be bugger-all worth conserving the way this lot are carrying on.
        When on earth is someone going to step up to the plate and bellow, “I’m mad as hell and I’m not gonna take it any more!”? It’ll take someone with cojones, organs singularly (or doubly) lacking in the inhabitants of Westminster it would seem.
        May needs ousting and replacing, as per your comments.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Grumpyashell · · Reply

    I think we are whistling in the wind if you think that Conservative Central HQ will take any notice of what the constituencies say,over the years they have let the constituency base wither because they think they are better than the common folk. It is this arrogance that makes the Westminster bubble work for them,in the referendum London was and still is subject to a blanket remain view,sad but true….the only thing that would concentrate their minds though would be if the constituencies themselves rebelled and made themselves independent Conservative offices….could it happen …that is the question

    Liked by 1 person

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      Fair, if depressing point Grumpy! However, the fact remains that if the Conservative Party at large continues on its current trajectory, regardless of where power within the Party actually lies, it will be annihilated at the next General Election. Quite often I think that annihilation of the Conservative Party as it is today would be no bad thing. A conservative-libertarian party might then rise like a phoenix from the ashes. Wishful thinking? I’m not so sure …

      Like

  3. […] This article was first published in Moraymint Chatter. We’re happy to  republish with kind permission by the […]

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Grumpyashell · · Reply

      I have put this on other threads that I think May will survive until after the Brexit date in March,she has the backbone of the remainer MPs behind her,but after March a few weeks later,there are local elections where I think will be her political death….if there is a melt down,plus if UKIP makes a huge comeback the political elite of all the main parties will go into apoplexy ….most voters stay tribal in general elections but in locals they are more likely to take risks and give political parties a kicking

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Douglas Brodie · · Reply

    As I understand it, Dominic Raab is in charge of preparing for a no deal Brexit. As this is looking more and more likely I think he should stay in post. He is preparing for what the majority voted for, knowing that the EU were unlikely to give us any kind of favourable deal.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      It’s a fair point, Douglas. However, the main effort of the UK’s negotiations with the EU rests with Olly Robbins and the PM. Whilst it’s relatively comforting to think that somebody (Raab) is leading preparations for a no-deal departure from the EU, the government’s policy and primary aim is to strike a deal with the EU. If the deal looks anything like the Chequers White Paper (and it could, of course, but swayed further towards half-in/half-out of the EU), then Brexit Means Remain. That said, it does seem that Barnier and his cronies might well reject the Chequers proposals, or demand yet more concessions to the EU’s position.

      The situation is now so crazy, I think that if Raab resigned the pressure on May would become intolerable. Planning and preparation for no-deal could, should and would – I believe – proceed with or without Raab in post. If May was toppled and a pro-Leave PM and Cabinet established, Raab – or somebody else of his calibre and views – could be re-installed.

      But, perhaps like you, I admire Dominic Raab from what I’ve seen …

      Like

  5. reallyoldbill · · Reply

    Almost a carbon copy of the letter that I wrote (at the very least in sentiment) to my local Conservative Association and MP (allegedly a Brexiteer) and surprise, surprise I didn’t even have the courtesy of a reply beyond an automated acknowledgement from the MP’s office. I have also been bombarded with emails (allegedly) from the party chairman and the prime minister, but in reality probably sent by a spotty-faced intern at CCHQ, attempting to justify the Chequers proposal as delivering on the referendum result. I returned them with requests that I don’t receive any more messages containing blatant untruths because I am not stupid and can read but they keep on coming. They simply don’t get it and I can almost sense the anger that is building up not just in the party grassroots, both members and natural supporters, but the nation at large. I really don’t believe they care and seem honestly to think that the threat of a Corbyn government will keep the likes of us meekly in their corner; they are wrong.

    It is clear that the PM never intended to deliver on her manifesto promises, her speeches or the referendum result and that much is obvious and undeniable with the benefit of hindsight. All her actions have been those of a thoroughly dishonest person and Machiavellian politician, but she may well have over-reached this time. People are not as stupid as she and her Rasputin-like adviser seem to believe and can clearly identify a betrayal when they see one. Her plan does not even come close to returning the country and its sovereignty to those to whom it belongs and have demanded that it should be. The consequences of refusing to honour the largest ever mandate for anything in the history of the nation are, frankly, unknowable, but are obviously laden with peril for the peaceful society that we have come to take for granted. If the establishment don’t play by accepted rules then why should anybody else. I have made the point elsewhere (under a different posting name) but a king didn’t lose his head simply to have one tyrant replaced by a parliamentary chamber of 650. Either the people’s votes matter and are respected or all bets must be off as to how society functions in future. I know I am not alone in refusing to accept the role of serf ruled by elected barons in a supposed democracy for which I have shed blood in uniformed service.

    It is obvious that the opponents of Brexit have been well funded and organised and the campaign to overturn the referendum has gathered pace and will continue to do so. The lack of any push-back by Brexiteers in any organised fashion is disheartening and to be honest bewildering: if we miss this chance to free ourselves from the shackles of the EU then another might never appear in my lifetime. It really is now or never and the outrageous bias being publicly displayed by the establishment, from the broadcast media, through unelected quangos like the Electoral Commission right to the very heart of our supposed democracy – parliament itself – proves just how far we have strayed from the honest, fair and decent society into which I was born. If May succeeds in her mission to betray a full and proper Brexit, and turn a once free and proud nation with over a thousand years of liberty and sovereignty behind it, into a vassal state of the EU, denied a voice but destined to accept whatever socially divisive and counter-productive dictat it sees fit to impose upon us, then the inevitable destruction of the Conservative party at the next election will be of very little comfort indeed, but still one in which I will willingly participate. Given that most politicians, with just a few honourable exceptions, care more for their careers and personal advancement than they do for the country they are supposed to serve, you would have expected Conservative MPs, faced with the certain knowledge that their party faces electoral oblivion at the next election if this deceit is not reversed and very quickly indeed, would smell the coffee and unseat May who is now both unwilling and unable to reverse course to a proper Brexit as she promised. Just how much evidence they need to understand that reality is a mystery, but sufficient pressure through constituency associations and opinion polls over the summer might just wake some of the less ideological Europhiles up to their fate unless they do. Autumn conference should be an interesting affair.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      Good stuff as ever, Bill. I do think that the workings of our national politics that we’re experiencing today is unprecedented in the post-WW2 era. OK, there have been some interesting times since the early 1950s, but nothing quite like this in my view. This is no longer about a country, the UK, relinquishing its membership of a treaty bloc. The situation has morphed into a complete breakdown of the UK’s democratic institutions and processes. I believe that this is a reflection of the fact that for a generation the British people have been duped into believing that we’re being governed at home, whereas in fact we have been governed from abroad by foreign and alien institutions (unaccountable institutions), and under a legal system (Napoleonic coded law) entirely at odds with our common law legal system.

      Our politicians have lapped this up because they can and have blamed virtually all of our economic, political and social challenges and woes on ‘Europe’. The political class has been able to have its cake and eat it. They’ve had a largely unaccountable life of Riley for 40-odd years, but now the chickens are coming home to roost. And the politicians really don’t like it and, moreover, have no idea how to respond.

      The situation stinks to high heaven and with each passing day I feel we really do inch closer to civil disorder in the fullness of time.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. reallyoldbill · · Reply

        I think the scales may have fallen from many eyes in recent weeks as to just how corrupt our whole establishment has become, quite probably as you suggest because of the malign influence that our misguided relationship with the European folly has encouraged. The whole EU construction was deliberately designed not just to be undemocratic but actively anti-democratic, with the electoral power of the citizens of the continent constrained and consigned to a fig leaf cover for the actual reality. Indeed, in many unguarded moments there have been verbal admissions to that effect by senior EU players, almost rejoicing in the unfettered power enjoyed by the commission and their complete disdain for democratic votes or mandates. The current president of the commission is notable in this regard. Many in Britain watched in amazement over recent years as country after country, having had the temerity to vote against a particular EU proposal, was forced to vote again to give the right answer or simply had their votes outflanked by political sleight of hand. I never, even in my darkest moments, thought that the same thing would be tried in the UK, a country which has successfully exported parliamentary democracy to fledgling nations across the globe, and yet here we are. We even have a prominent, if not particularly cerebral, Labour backbencher, tweeting about “will of the people bollocks” which pretty well sums up the state of our current parliament and its members whose belief in real democracy is tenuous at best. I don’t believe that the corrosive and creeping corruption that has spread across the entire establishment and political structure is unrelated to our membership of the union that is headquartered in Brussels. It may be too late to alter the mindset of many senior members of the UK elite so a “hard reset” of our constitutional arrangements to bring them back into line with Magna Carta, Common Law and the Bill of Rights may well be necessary; they are too valuable and cost too much in blood and treasure to be simply allowed to wither on the vine. It is my sincere hope that this can be done peacefully because enough sane heads at Westminster wake up to exactly what is at stake, but if not, I fear that you concerns about civil unrest may prove to be well founded.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. flyer · · Reply

    Totally agree moraymint, I’ve just had an article published in UKIP Daily that echo your thoughts. I may lack your polished writing skills and my articles are more of a rant, but it’s all stuff that needs to be said.

    “The New UK/raine”

    https://www.ukipdaily.com/the-new-uk-raine/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      Good, thanks. I may link up again with UKIP Daily. They published a fair number of my posts in the run up to the EU Referendum …

      Like

      1. flyer · · Reply

        I’m sure they’d be delighted to hear from you at UKIP Daily.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. This is what happens when ‘clever’ people drop their principles and pursue the pragmatic approach to democracy, through the mechanism of tactical voting.Eventually, the principles get totally lost in the fog by trying to achieve instant gratification.The current ‘problem’ with the perceived leadership issue was almost inevitable and predictable. The conservative party is no better than the other two ‘main’ parties where party is put above all else. A good leader of a party cannot be a good leader for the country.
    Until we are prepared to clearly identify our own principles, and stick to them, politicians will continue to go their own way.
    Cameron’s insistence on centralising MP selection , no right of recall and the fixed term parliament act have all contributed to accelerating the deteriorating democratic process.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      Excellent, thanks g4air. Your last point about Cameron’s re-shaping of the Party’s selection procedures etc is particularly apposite …

      Like

      1. Glad you liked it Moray. Erstewhile Davebr! Have a good year.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Your letter fairly mirrors my own letter sent to my Conservative MP, who incidentally is also the Party Chairman. His response was sadly more rhetoric & a copy of the PM’s statement to the House of Commons after Chequers. Insofar as being able to oust May, I do believe that 48 letters of no confidence is the easy part. Obtaining a 50% tory MP majority however on a vote of no confidence with the majority of tory MPs fervent remainers may not be as easy. If ERG can’t guarantee a majority to oust May, then their hands will have been tied for a further 12 months, as no further challenge will be possible. There’s little point in forcing a no confidence vote with 48 letters if that majority can’t be guaranteed. May will dig her self into a bigger hole & then I suspect & hope ERG will take action.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      Good analysis, Roger. One wonders at what point all this shenanigans will tip into a General Election, at which juncture all bets are off as to where we end up then. Our politics is in the mother-of-all messes at the moment. The British political class has become and remains so wedded to Rule-By-The-European Union that its capability to govern our country effectively and reasonably now is shot to pieces. Frightening really, but entirely consistent with the overarching philosophy of the European Union’s founding fathers …

      Like

  9. akrasia · · Reply

    I believe your reply to my comment defines our positions perfectly.
    You appear to believe a state will maintain of sorts.

    I suspect the system fails… and then we are where we are…

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Peter · · Reply

    May is terrible but where are Davis and Johnson and Gove? Apparent spectators prepared to watch Brexit crash than risk position and reputation to do something about it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      You’ve kind of reinforced my point, Peter …

      Like

  11. akrasia · · Reply

    With respect to you all and you Moraymint (many thanks to you again for your prescient analysis).
    However, in short. Let it go.
    ‘They’ could care less whether you vote or not – the game is rigged for elites only.
    Re : jayengee,”the country really needs an inspirational leader…”. Isn’t this part of the problem?
    There isn’t one. There is no Superman/Superwoman/Supertrans. It’s over. It really is time to stop expecting Government support and move on accordingly. History and human nature should tell us where we’re headed.

    It’s ordinary people or nobody. We will have to make the change through personal responsibility and communal effort. There are precedents for this.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      There is indeed something in what you say there, akrasia. That said, I’d need to give some thought as to how ‘personal responsibility and communal effort’ could be made to work in practice at the level of the nation state …

      Like

  12. […] via BREXIT | THERESA MAY MUST BE REMOVED FROM OFFICE […]

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Olly Robbins is to the UK what Peter Strzok is to the USA.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      I like the analogy, sir …

      Like

      1. In fact no one has ever seen the two of them in the same room at the same time. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  14. I’m disgusted by Mrs May’s actions in allowing a convinced Europhile Civil Servant to negotiate directly with the European Commission and actually believe that it is unconstitutional. She forced two Brexit ministers to resign and has sidelined a third.

    Although I live in a constituency which is currently held by a former Labour, now Independent, MP it is usually (Il)LiberalDemocrat, I joined the Conservative Party in order to hopefully elect Theresa May’s replacement. I don’t trust Michael Gove although he is an effective minister, so my choice would be between Jacob Rees-Mogg and Boris Johnston. The country really needs an inspirational leader who is not frightened to make mistakes, and Boris fits that bill. He would frighten Barnier and Corbyn so what’s not to like? Let’s hope that the letters go in, May resigns and Hammond and Robbins go. The rest would be history, but the bad taste of May will last a long time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. moraymint · · Reply

      Good points there, thanks jayengee.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

“We do not believe any group of men adequate enough or wise enough to operate without scrutiny or without criticism. We know that the only way to avoid error is to detect it, that the only way to detect it is to be free to inquire. We know that in secrecy error undetected will flourish and subvert”. - J Robert Oppenheimer.

Chai et Rasade

The Vintage Wine Seller's Blog

Moraymint Chatter

A father's thoughts for his children ... and other stuff

Chauncey Tinker's Blog

Reversing "Western" decline with reason.

The Participator

A father's thoughts for his children ... and other stuff

The Worldview

Explaining our world in simple terms

The Brexit Door

Independent thinking for an Independent Britain

EU Referendum Blog

A father's thoughts for his children ... and other stuff

The Slog.

An incorrigible Cognitive Dissident

Surplus Energy Economics

How the economy REALLY works - Tim Morgan

Guido Fawkes

Parliamentary plots and conspiracy

BarristerBlogger

Matthew Scott's Legal Comment Argument and Discussion. Comment Awards 2015 Best Independent Blog

Our Finite World

Exploring how oil limits affect the economy

Independent Sovereign Democratic Britain

A father's thoughts for his children ... and other stuff

Sandy Paterson Mountaineering

A father's thoughts for his children ... and other stuff

Do the Math

A father's thoughts for his children ... and other stuff

John Seymour School

Fruit and Vegetables, Beer, Wine and Cider, Jam, Bread, Jelly, Pigs, Chickens, Eggs, Sausages and Bacon, Pickles and Compost

The Archdruid Report

A father's thoughts for his children ... and other stuff

the.one&only-elspie

A father's thoughts for his children ... and other stuff

%d bloggers like this: